4 Easy Tips to Tying Better Fishing Knots

4 Easy Tips to Tying Better Fishing Knots

So the most basic element of fishing is your connection to what it is you intend to fool the bass into biting so that you can hook the fish, fight him with your rod and reel and capture the fish. Whether an angler chooses to fish for bass with live bait or artifical bass lures, ...

So the most basic element of fishing is your connection to what it is you intend to fool the bass into biting so that you can hook the fish, fight him with your rod and reel and capture the fish. Whether an angler chooses to fish for bass with live bait or artifical bass lures, your fishing knot is the most important element to the process. A weak knot greatly reduces your chance of catching and landing bass.

So it’s important to not only know the fundamentals of good knot tying, but also a series of good knots that serve specific purposes and secure your bait or hook to your line in a manner that can withstand the abuse of not only the fish but the surrounding environment whether that be rocks, wood, metal or thick grass.

Four things will help you tie a strong knot:



  • Tie linearly


  • Moisten your line


  • Pull slowly to tighten line


  • Check pull strength on main line




Keep your wraps in order

Knots are generally slip knots or jam knots, both of which feature a series of twists or wraps and a tag end generally passed through a loop or opening and pulled tight. Pulling these wraps together requires not crossing them over one another. Crossed lines are what will cause most of your knot wear and breaks.

Wetter is better

It’s fairly straight forward, but things that are lubricated slide easier than things that are dry.

Slow down

To avoid friction and wraps crossing, work the wraps down the line, slowly until they are lined up neatly next to each other. Then slowly apply pressure and cinch the knot but pulling on the tag end and mainline simultaneously until the knot feels snug.

Most avid anglers can tie a good knot in a matter of seconds, but you should always slow down on the tightening or cinching step to make sure your knot is neat and properly secured to the eye of the hook or bait.

Pull on it to make sure

Once you have the knot tied down, grab your lure or hook in one hand the and the mainline in the other hand and give it a tug or two to make sure it’s solid and ready for action.

Read the Wired2fish Knot Guide

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